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Palliative Care Toolkit

This 44-page guide from the Evangelical Fellowship of Canada, Palliative Care Toolkit, considers how best to support people who are living with serious illness or are nearing life's end. 

Disability Concerns
Blog
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The Drawing of Jesus Hides a Big Stain

I’m more comfortable with answers than questions, authority than weakness, and qualification by academic degree than qualification by suffering. But I’m learning that effectiveness in chaplaincy requires me to walk into the circle of my discomfort.

ChaplaincyDisability Concerns
Blog
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Being Remembered

Memory loss, the journey of dementia, and Alzheimer’s disease are among the most difficult journeys. But as individuals and the church, we can offer support through the act of remembering stories.  

Disability Concerns
Article
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Lasting Response to Painful Touch

Ann Ballard has found healing after experiencing abuse as an adolescent. Her abuser took advantage of the fact that she has night blindness and cannot hear without her hearing aids.

Disability Concerns
Blog
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Disability Doesn't Preclude Wellness

One can be well and live with a serious mental illness or disability. But wellness does require community (such as a church). Therefore let's ask, "Is my church a place where people can be well?" 

Disability Concerns
Article
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Support Group Successes and Failures

Speaking from the experience of the rise and fall of a Disabilities Support Group my wife and I initiated in 2011, I'll reflect on what went well and also the feedback on ways we could have improved.

Disability Concerns
Blog
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Just Walk with Me

What I’d really like is if you would “just walk with me”. If you’ve been where I am, tell me how you felt in a way that I can know you’re trying to walk with me — not change me.

Disability Concerns

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