Rediscovering Servant Leadership at Inspire 2019

  209 views

A significant challenge for a disciple of Jesus is to practice servant leadership. We do not have to be afraid of being a servant or being a leader. Regardless of our historical, cultural, and life experiences, Jesus is our model of a servant leader. How do we fully embrace servant leadership in every aspect of life?

The Rediscovering Servant Leadership workshop at Inspire 2019, held in Windsor, Ontario, focused on the four characteristics of servant leadership: humility, service, focus on others, and love.* Facilitator Denise Posie began the session with the CRCNA mission, emphasizing that servant leadership is the fifth component of our five-fold calling of denominational ministries and initiatives.

What is servant leadership? One helpful definition originated from our CRC Office in Canada: 

"Servant Leadership has the mission of identifying, recruiting, and training leaders to be servants in the kingdom of God. The lifelong equipping of all leaders is essential for the flourishing of churches and ministries. Servant leaders put their focus on the growth of the ministries and the communities that they serve. This type of inspired leadership encourages transformation.” 

Using Jesus as our model of a servant first and then a leader, small groups explored Matthew 20:25-28 and John 13. Perhaps your church or ministry might consider using these passages in a small group setting to see what you discover about servant leadership.

One emerging leader shared a takeaway. The workshop helped link servant and leader. At times, they seem conflicting, but they are not. Both are significant and demonstrated by Jesus. We do not have to prove and legitimize ourselves. Today’s society teaches us to focus on self. Sometimes we focus too much on our gifts and experiences. “I was impressed to focus on others. It was liberating!”

*A Snapshot of a Servant Leader by Aubrey Malphurs, Being Leaders, Baker Books, a division of Baker Publishing Group, 2003. Used by permission.

Posted in:
Image Credit

The Network hosts user-submitted content.
Posts don't necessarily imply CRCNA endorsement, but must comply with our community guidelines.

Let's Discuss…

We love your comments! Thanks for your help upholding the Community Guidelines to make this an encouraging and respectful community for everyone.

I often wonder whether the term "servant leadership" is applied to too limited a number of "positions".  Because God has equipped people with different skills and opportunities, leadership can be exercised in many different ways.  Leadership is not limited to pastors, elders, deacons or "educated", that is "schooled" folk, but is attainable to almost all and comes to expression if a variety of ways.  Leadership and expertise go together but it is when expertise is acknowledged and allowed to be exercised within the context of a community of servants of all kinds that a Christian community can flourish and demonstrate the sprinkling of God's gifts and grace to all people.

Community Builder

Hi John,

Thank you for your comment! I agree totally with your comment! I especially like "Because God has equipped people with different skills and opportunities, leadership can be exercised in many different ways...Leadership and expertise go together but it is when expertise is acknowledged and allowed to be exercised within the context of a community of servants of all kinds that a Christian community can flourish and demonstrate the sprinkling of God's gifts and grace to all people." My experience is sometimes when we don't even see what we have, someone comes alongside to help us use what God has given us for his glory. Yes, in a Christian or non-Christian community, we're called to be servant leaders. Thanks again!

Community Builder

We are all called to serve one another in love. That's what Jesus showed us, and the Spirit empowers us to be other-centered, which is very counter-cultural! This is good - thanks.