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Thank you for your article.  I miss one aspect of pastoral ministry or function in your article, and that is to pray. Prayer for the congregation and community.  Although much may be changing, I hope this aspect of pastoral function never changes.

Very good post. Mother Theresa had a similar experience; and many pastors probably suffer in secret. And I think of our colleague who suffered from severe depression and disappeared a year and a half ago. Wounded healers.

techsoup website allows churches to register for software donations in including quickbooks.  the admin fee for the donation is well under $100

you can also get microsoft office full versions and/or microsoft windows upgrades for small admin fees.

Justin,

I have addressed this question on pages 119, 120 and 294, 295 of Christian Reformed Church Order Commentary.  Perhaps someone in your church has one or you can order it from Faith Alive Resources.  Hope it helps.

 

We know things are either really really good, or really really bad, when we worry about handraising by leaders in church.  Really really good because we have nothing serious to worry about, or really really bad when we make rules about such things as qualifications for raising hands by someone who has already been deemed qualified to lead a service.  Compared to leading or reading or presenting a service/sermon, .... shouldn't we be blessing each other anyway?  Does the raising of a hand or two make the blessing more legitimate?  May God bless us all.  

Great post! It made me think of Job, when his three friends first saw what had happened to him they, "began to weep aloud, and they tore their robes and sprinkled dust on their heads. Then they sat on the ground with him for seven days and seven nights. No one said a word to him, because they saw how great his suffering was." Later on in the book, when they tried all their words, things didn't go so well. There is much to be said for a "ministry of presence" without words.

Well put.  Thank you for saying that.

AMEN!  I did not have the privilege of knowing Pastor Case Admiraal as you did, Jul, but I appreciate the reminder to give thanks to God for many pastors in my life.

I wonder if we come from a tradition of not asking enough questions, and for that reason, sometimes do not know how to respond to questions.  I've often seen questions not as questions, but as someone's challenge to scripture, or challenging God, or challenging authority.  Questions truly asked, vs rhetorical questions asked in anger are different.  

When asked questions, perhaps it would be good for us to ask questions in return?  

But I don't think you should say you are not sure about the answer unless you are really not sure.  Lying about that will not give you your internal credibility in trying to understand another.  

This certainly resonates.  I do get the impression that some people think being reformed means to do what the world does, and then color it christian.   I don't think that's what the reformation was about.

A position with this job description applies to a very, very large church. To put context to a job description like this you need to supply the context  (number of other employees this person is expected to work with). The average church in the CRCNA has only 225 members (1103/282500 source 2013 year book). A church that size would not have a function you outlined. But publishing these job descriptions is a good idea.

From someone who likes to ask questions, and who tends to see lots of gray rather that black and white, I want to thank you for posting this. I especially love the last paragraph. Jesus has prayed that his followers live together in unity (see John 17). That does not mean that we will all think the same way, or come to the same conclusions. In this world of seemingly greater and greater polarization, and the disrespectful dialog that accompanies that, I believe that we, as the church, have a chance to shine in the darkness by the way we respect and honor one another, even those who think differently from ourselves. Asking questions is an important way to gain understanding; so glad to see it's being encouraged.

I wish the article contained some Biblical references to support the position. We know that God placed us in the world to influence the world and not to become like it (John 17:14-16).  But when we begin to adopt to the system and practice of the world, we have compromised, weakened and perhaps corrupted our influence.  In the language of Jesus, we have lost our saltiness (Matthew 5:13).  The bottomline is: As Christians, our faith and practice should be directed by Scripture alone; otherwise we have deviated from "Sola Scriptura" and fallen prey to the trap of "relevance."        

posted in: Redeeming Halloween

Thanks for sharing your thoughts, Mario. And no insult to vet's is intended--thank you for serving our country!

posted in: Redeeming Halloween

Hi Melissa,
I am so glad you raised that issue! I am currently coaching an ordained, female, CRC chaplain who gave a sigh and said "Why didn't my husband know about this event?" and I felt guilty as I shared that it was a 'girls only' event. The brief discussion that ensued ended with a commitment on my part to follow up on what kind of support SPE offers to the male spouses of pastors in the CRC. With permission, here is a quote from Lis Van Harten, SPE Program Director:
"Pastors' spouses, who are male, are growing in number. In last several years, we've done two surveys of male spouses to determine their interest in getting together in a variety of ways. The first results were basically "thanks but not interested". The second time around there was some interest but not a lot...

There aren't any plans in place at this time for "male spouses". I think it's something we should revisit in 2015. Perhaps another survey would be a good place to start and then see if we can't get something in the works - if, of course, the interest is there...Please assure her that we're not ignoring male spouses."

So, no, there isn't space for them at this particular event. And truly, being a female pastoral spouse is such a unique path to walk, I am not sure that the male spouses would find it as valuable in meeting their unique needs. They face  a very different set of expectations and different ways in which those expectations are expressed by church members and society in general. In a strange way, attending an event such as this may leave them feeling more alone, because they don't relate to the experiences being shared by the women.

SPE shared that they have encountered this even amongst the female pastoral spouses, if they aren't involved in parish ministry (so youth pastor, chaplain, etc.). Those spouses have provided feedback along the lines of "I couldn't relate to what was going on. I'm in a different setting." So it really is tough to meet all the diverse needs and in trying to be more generally supportive, there is a risk of losing the impact for any.

I highly recommend that anyone who wishes to see further development of the support offered to male pastoral spouses be in contact with the Sustaining Pastoral Excellence office: pastoralexcellence@crcna.org.

 

 

 

 

 

 

posted in: A Needed Gift

This sounds like it was a wonderful time together, however, it has left me wondering about those pastor's spouses who are husbands - is there a place for them at this type of event?  Are there events like this which welcome all the spouses - male or female?

posted in: A Needed Gift

Thank you for how you shared your thoughts on this and how you can use this to share the light of Jesus. I know for myself, my wife and i battled over it for years as our children grew. At our previous church and our current church they have provided alternative options for different reasons, the first being safety and for my current church more of an outreach that brings people onto our campus that typically wouldn't come. We provide information about our church and its programs like Cadet's, Gem's and youth programs along with a great evening of trunk or treats, bouncers and food court. (food court-local cub scout fund raiser) We us this to open ourselves to our local community and share the love of Jesus and invite them to an event that will last for eternity. Great post, i did feel a bit insulted as you would lump Veteran's Day with Halloween as i am a US Army Veteran, blessings to you and may you continue to shine the Light in your community for Jesus.

posted in: Redeeming Halloween

I was so relieved to see at the end of the article, the awareness of the coincidence (not) with Reformation Day.  On almost the cusp now of the 500th Anniversary of that historic happening, we should redouble efforts to both educate the next generation and also figure out how we are going to engage our Roman Catholic neighbors constructively.  

 

posted in: Redeeming Halloween

Thanks, Shannon! This is really helpful.

posted in: Redeeming Halloween

George, I don't want to minimize the unity of the church.  However, it seems to me that your article is concentrating more on the unity of ministers, and not on unity in the church.  I am assuming also that you are referring to crc ministers getting together, although you don't say.  Then you refer to only 5 or 6 ministers present from other churches, but again, I assume only crc churches.  

John 17 is referring to much more than just ministers.  It is referring to much more than just crc.  To find unity in diversity is the difficulty we have as christians.  To understand the combination of orthodoxy and orthopraxis is also a difficulty.  But I would say the issue of attending a funeral or having ministerial meetings is not first of all a matter of unity, but a matter of pastoral care.   There is unity in it, yes, but if ministerial meetings only involve one denomination, then there is also a matter of disunity inherent in it.  Ironically.  

On the other hand, unity is an important issue and we must struggle with it.   Our desire for unity is at the root of every christian's desire to love one another as Christ loved us.  

My own goal for unity would be to have those who believe infant baptism is okay to be united with those who prefer adult baptism.  Can you imagine neither one condemning the other, and respecting the unique aspects of each approach?  It seems inconceivable....  

Of course Jerry, I could not include every detail... thankful for the CRCHM!

 

Yes Ryan, I agree with Jon, a "beautiful and humbly-told true story of church planting."  Many of us are praying with you for a New City 2 and New City 3!  And don't forget to add that a supportive denomination provided you with over $15,000.00 that first year with more to follow.  I think that makes the story even more beautiful!

  " At the level of a council, there are a number of things which can be especially helpful:• View the pastor as a partner in ministry; with the elders, a shepherding team..."   This comment made above is particularly relevant.  However, the suggestions that followed this comment do not seem to follow from it, since they emphasize how the pastor is different, not how he partners.  The heavy reliance on the pastor, such as for preaching on christmas day for 25 years, for example, is caused mostly because of the inability of the partners to carry on the task.  In order to have true partnership, the elders should be able to be a true shepherding team, and carry on the task if the pastor has personal desires and obligations.  It is for this reason, as well as for enhancing the partnership, that pastors should be training the elders, and elders should be training each other.  While the primary role of the pastor is understood, and the function of primary caregiver is known, it should never be thought that others are unable or unwilling to carry out the tasks, roles and responsibilities.   This alone would relieve a great deal of stress and pressure from the pastor, and would encourage growth of the entire church.

Here is a response from another blog on the Network by Larry Dornboos.  The response was by   Norman Sennema on May 10, 2014  I thought the whole thing was very relevant and spoke my thoughts well, so I'm including the whole thing.

"Thanks for sharing this, a great topic, one that I have been personally wrestling with. I would avoid the extremes (no need for shepherds at all, calling people only to be 'self-feeders'), but would encourage a rethink of how we think about shepherding. I would like to add to this discussion, and to hear what your responses to my 'rant' might be.

1) An important qualifier is that we are under-shepherds, working for the Chief Shepherd (1 Peter 5:1-4). My fear is that instead of helping the sheep hear His Voice (John 10:27), we are training people to know our voice. They come to rely on us to interpret scripture for them. Or if they don't like our voice, they look for a shepherd who's voice they prefer. The shepherds need to improve their voice to keep their audience, and compete with others in order to satisfy their sheep... or they look for greener pastures. Somehow we need to teach the sheep to hear His Voice whenever scripture is opened, whether the sermon is good or bad, the speaker is dynamic or bland, ordained or not ordained. For me, the Voice of God (Logos, Jesus) is more important than the mouthpiece (which we need too); whether the mouthpiece is a professor, pastor or pew-sitter, a sunday school teacher, a parent, a youth group leader, or a stranger on the street, God's Voice needs to be heard. 

2) I would suggest adding another image to help us explain the shepherding image: a parent (1 Thessalonians 2:7-12). When children are young, they need to be fed. But eventually they need to learn to feed themselves, and eventually even feed others. This does not end the parents role, they still help them get the food, help them prepare it for a time, but the children eat for themselves. And soon they are able to prepare a meal, and maybe even surprise their parents with a meal prepared for them. And one day, they will have opportunity to feed their own children. By feeding themselves, I don't mean 'self-feeding' as you characterized it (independent, individualistic). Eating and feeding should always be communal affairs, but at some point the kids need to grow up and eat... with the support of the community. My experience is that we make 'food preparation' so complicated that you have to have a seminary degree to do it rightly. We not only lead our sheep to the table, we precut the food, we decide on what to eat, when and how, we even make them sit quiet and still while we spoon feed them. This makes sense for babies, but when do they grow up? See Hebrews 5:11-14, where eventually the babes become teachers, who by constant use they have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil.

3) How many of us have heard those dreaded words, 'I'm not being fed'. They make it sound as if they are deeper than we are, that their maturity level has grown beyond our shepherding skills. But that is not what I hear. I hear baby robbins squawking in the nest, demanding that we give them what they want - feed me, love me, help me, teach me, care for me, comfort me... This is the kind of SELF-feeding that I think we need to address. They have not grown up, they are still in their high chairs, with their clean bibs, waiting for us to spoon feed them. Is this cycnical... maybe? True of everyone... of course not. But it is I fear a common pattern, one that is related to our traditional shepherding/preaching ideas and practices.

4) I am presently serving in a long time 'church plant' setting. We have lots of babes in Christ, and they do not know how to hear God's Voice. But they have learned enough of churchianity to know that some shepherds provide better sermons than others. I have felt the pressure to perform better, to compete with the mega-shepherds. But that is not the way I want to go. I am who I am, and I do the best I can. I need to instill in them a love for God's Voice in scripture, and an ability to feed themselves in community, to grow up and eventually become teachers, who by constant use of Scripture have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil. My sermons are not all great, and some of them are pretty bad, but the scripture is always great, and God's Voice can always be heard. 

5) So I am trying something, and praying that it will help. I've adopted a three year bible-reading schedule. I hand out the readings each week, and highlight which reading from that list I will be preaching on next Sunday. The handout has open space for them to answer the question beneath each reading, 'what do you hear God saying?'. I blog my own reflections for each reading, each day, and ask them to post their own thoughts. I email 5-10 members each week and ask them to share their responses to the upcoming Scripture passage, and incorporate their responses into the message (I would love to meet weekly with some, as I've heard other pastors do, but in my busy, commuter culture meeting time is at a premium). On Sunday morning, I attempt a partial 'lectio' by reading the scripture, pausing, then reading it again. Then I ask them to share what they hear God saying in the scripture. Finally, I share some of my own reflections, trying to model how we need to all hear God's Voice in scripture. I am letting them know that one day I may be asking them to publicly share their own reflections in a 'sermon'. So far only two have done so... but in time.

6) I have discouraged them from saying 'good sermon' to me after the service (that was easy, not too many did). Instead I've urged them to share with me if they heard God speaking to them - teaching, rebuking, correcting, training, comforting, blessing, etc. - in the service. Sometimes it was in a prayer, sometimes in a song, sometimes in message. One time a young girl shared with me what God said to her in the passage, and it had nothing to do with my 'sermon'. Thing is, after I heard what she said, I myself heard God differently, through her 'sermon'! I am often surprised and blessed by what others hear God saying in scripture. I realize that all my training and experience gives me tunnel vision, seeing things that others don't see, and missing (obvious) things that others do see. Reading scripture and hearing God is indeed a communal activity - we should stop restricting it to the educated and qualified few. 

7) I fear that our emphasis on ordination and the formal 'preaching of the word' has held back the church. We stress the anointing of the pastor, but scripture also stresses the anointing of the disciples, so that they do not need anyone to teach them (1 John 2:26-27). It is the Spirit that teaches us, it is the scripture that is God-breathed and useful, a double-edged sword. Why is it that so many christians do not know how to proclaim (preach, share) Jesus in the marketplace? Because we've hired that task out to a limited few. When the early church was persecuted, the disciples that scattered preached the word wherever they went (Acts 8:1-4); today they just look for another church to preach it to them. Think of the story of the church in China, when the communist government killed the pastors, burned the bibles and books, sent away the missionaries, scattered the churches, closed the seminaries. The west thought for sure the church was toast; but they (and the Chinese government) forgot about the Holy Spirit, the Chief Shepherd, and the power of God's Voice. When the walls in China finally opened a little, the west found a thriving church. Still to this day ordinary people (without seminary training) are being used by God to speak, and be heard. We need to learn from them!!!

Conclusion. Do we still need shepherds? Yes! But do we need to rethink what shepherds do, and how they do it? YES! Reading scripture for yourself is not the self-feeding that concerns me. I feel the bigger problem is the SELF-FEEDING of baby sheep that never seem to grow up and learn to feed others."

And I would add, that it seems sometimes the shepherds only feed, and do not teach others to feed.  They give the flock a fish, but never a fishing rod.  (mixed metaphor... but you get the idea).

posted in: Gracious Residue

A beautiful, humbly-told true story of church planting. Thank you.

Hmm.  The difficulty with an analogy is that the desire to understand it is key.  I understand your analogy of  food for the body to food for the soul.  But, you should understand my poor analogy of recipe and serving as well.  I understand the Word is not a recipe book... its just an analogy.   You don't have to be a master chef in order to bring some hot dogs, relish, roasting sticks, marshmallows to a picnic.  Its not hard to add some corn and honey dew melons, and presto, you have a meal.  Fairly nourishing, especially if you add some tomatoes and carrots from the garden.   It might not be the only meal you would want, but you wouldn't starve.

Presentation matters?  It probably helps.  But maybe it doesn't.  Presentation that clarifies for one person is a roadblock for another person.  Moses thought he couldn't speak... so he got Aaron to help.  But either way, presentation would not have changed the outcome for someone who had his own agenda.

The problem I sometimes see is that some people are only ever concerned about being fed.  Feeding others is not their concern.  They get spiritually fat and spiritually lazy as a result.

Now I know the Word is not a recipe book;  perhaps more of a plan for building a house on a solid foundation.  But no analogy is perfect.  Our relationship with God is not a house, after all;  yet Jesus used this analogy.  Was it the apostle   that wrote:  leaving aside the milk of the gospel, the elementary things, for the meat is what we should be looking for?  Being fed what?  What's the milk?  what's the meat?  He seems to allude to the "recipe" being the meat... in other words, how do we live?   How do we shape our lives in response to God's grace?   Hebrews 5 and 6.  How do we cook the "meat...?

Ironically, it is only in sharing the "recipe", that we learn more about it.  And if we demonstrate the "recipe" (christian living) or forget certain items in the recipe, our actions speak louder than our words.

posted in: Gracious Residue

Serve it up: Maybe, probably not. Presentation matters and is a skill/craft/gift of it's own.

Deliver the Recipe: No, definitely not.

Share the Recipe: No.

The Word is not a recipe book. To turn it into recipes is a dimunition and a violation in my view.

 

 

 

 

posted in: Gracious Residue

You might not be able to cook all the meals, but certainly you should be able to serve them.

Should not sermons be delivering the recipes?  And should not you then be able to share these recipes with others?

posted in: Gracious Residue

"Could you cook all the meals that have nourished you in your life?" I asked, somewhat defensively, as a rookie preacher, when a man said in a group of people that he had heard enough sermons in his life that he could probably write and present one himself. I think it is a fair analogy, and I hear hints of it in what Scott wrote. Fair, minus the defensiveness.

My sister and I did a highly appreciated skit at a event celebrating our father's x number of years in the ministry, years ago. In the skit, our punchline was that we as kids would watch and test-taste the pan of soup Dad made on Saturday as he was finishing up his sermon. If it was spicy, watch out on Sunday! If it was bland, be ready as well.

I suppose I like food-nutrient analogies for sermons. 

posted in: Gracious Residue

Hebrews 5: 11 We have much to say about this, but it is hard to make it clear to you because you no longer try to understand. 12 In fact, though by this time you ought to be teachers, you need someone to teach you the elementary truths of God’s word all over again. You need milk, not solid food! 13 Anyone who lives on milk, being still an infant, is not acquainted with the teaching about righteousness. 14 But solid food is for the mature, who by constant use have trained themselves to distinguish good from evil.

Heb 6 Therefore let us move beyond the elementary teachings about Christ and be taken forward to maturity, not laying again the foundation of repentance from acts that lead to death,[a] and of faith in God, 2 instruction about cleansing rites,[b] the laying on of hands, the resurrection of the dead, and eternal judgment. 3 And God permitting, we will do so.

4 It is impossible for those who have once been enlightened, who have tasted the heavenly gift, who have shared in the Holy Spirit, 5 who have tasted the goodness of the word of God and the powers of the coming age 6 and who have fallen[c] away, to be brought back to repentance. To their loss they are crucifying the Son of God all over again and subjecting him to public disgrace. 7 Land that drinks in the rain often falling on it and that produces a crop useful to those for whom it is farmed receives the blessing of God. 8 But land that produces thorns and thistles is worthless and is in danger of being cursed. In the end it will be burned.

9 Even though we speak like this, dear friends, we are convinced of better things in your case—the things that have to do with salvation. 10 God is not unjust; he will not forget your work and the love you have shown him as you have helped his people and continue to help them. 11 We want each of you to show this same diligence to the very end, so that what you hope for may be fully realized. 12 We do not want you to become lazy, but to imitate those who through faith and patience inherit what has been promised.

posted in: Gracious Residue

Much preaching is pastoral, but not prophetic.   It considers the feelings of people, but not the feeling of God.

posted in: Prophetic Preaching

Verlyn,

Thanks for an interesting post on Paul's pastoral sense and strategy.

It's an interesting thesis: Paul learned gradually that local pastors have more influence than out-of-town experts and therefore shifted his strategy from writing letters to churches to writing letters to local pastors.

It's an interesting thesis, which I will explore with my students the next time I teach NT Survey.

But I think it breaks down at a couple of points.

-Paul's letters to Philippi and Thessalonica seem to have been well-received and accomplished their purpose. So maybe the contrast is not so much letter vs. personal presence as Corinth vs. Macedonia.

-It seems clear that Titus was able to turn the situation around in Corinth. This was likely due to his exceptional ability, more than the force of personal presence. Paul's personal presence in Corinth did not always accomplish his goals, any more than his letters did.

-having served in several locations as a local pastor, and on several occasions as the out-of-town expert (including writing "pastoral letters" from afar),  I do not think there is a clear pattern of local pastors having more influence. I have seen it work sometimes one way, sometimes the other.

Maybe the take-away point is: vary your strategy.  Which is, I guess, just what you say Paul was doing.

Thanks for writing,

Thomas Niehof

 

Thanks Larry!  Your words and example may well be used by the Lord to set other pastors free from this debilitating and dangerous disease!  Ken Van De Griend

Thanks, Paul,

Good read that encourages us. I think Sacramento  is blessed to have you as a pastor in its midst.

Shalom,

George

Good article.  It used to be in the southern part of the Netherlands, which is mostly Catholic, that you would see piles of rocks in the very middle of a farmers field.  Farmers would on purpose place a pile of rocks that were sort of "in the way" when they worked the land with tractors or harvest machinery.  It was said that as they had to make their way around these piles of rocks, it would remind them to pray and to thank the Lord of the Harvest.  As a protestant girl growing up in the Netherlands, I was told that this was superstitious but I am not so sure - it is good to have reminders to pray, to be thankful and to submit daily to our God.  If that is through a pile of rocks, a painting, a cross or whatever - that reminder is very helpful. Enjoy Tiffany Falls and the rocks that point to the Rock.

 

Thanks!  I can't believe 3 years later I am looking for the same resources again :)  If anyone else is interested the group is now called Compass and their website is under review at the moment.  For Canadians I strongly recommend the Canadian Council of Christian Charities www.CCCC.org   Their is a fee based on the size of your church.  I have used it in connection with another charity and it was invaluable.

 

Blessings, Victoria

Preaching should be about bringing the truth, repentance, salvation, and renewal into daily life.  It is not about saying something "nice".  Without condemning sin, there is no need for a Saviour.   Whether obedience is presented from a positive or negative perspective, the implication of disobedience is the same.  And certainly Peter condemned Annanias and Sapphira as deceivers and liars with dire consequences.  Paul certainly told the Corinthians (I Cor 5) to cast out the sexually immoral person (and to forgive based on repentance).  Revelations makes several judgements about the churches.  But, be careful.  Every elder, every christian needs to be careful about judging, because everyone can and will be judged.  Judge with compassion and forgiveness.   But do not think you are more compassionate or forgiving than the apostle Peter or Paul.   Or more compassionate than Jesus, who condemned hypocrisy and impure hearts.  Who told many parables about bearing fruit, or of using talents or minas given by God, who explained what would happen to the weeds, to the bad fish, and to the seed that fell on hard ground or was swallowed by weeds.  

Warnings about sin, or about false teaching, are love gifts to God's people, to keep them close to God.   

"Preaching should mostly be about saying something nice, but not at the cost of saying nothing at all in case the soundness of the faith is threatened." Really? Someone should speak to Paul Washer, David Wilkerson or Leonard Ravenhill.

I can't imagine any minister would disagree that sermon preparation is only one part of ministry.  That would be a pretty tough position to defend.

As Joshua Benton has correctly described of Jesus, "He took time to pray, he took time to connect with The Father, he took time to rest."

Regardless of how he used certain private moments, it's easy to picture those moments of Jesus' life as being free from interruption.  

While I have times where I do receive people who appear and phone calls that spontaneously arrive.  My only point is that I need pockets of time that are free from interruption from time to time, too.   Whether it is for another step forward in preparing the sermon or for going to bed for the night.  In the case of emergencies, there are even exceptions to guarding those important moments.  

Guarding certain pockets of time within reason is a necessary part of ministry for me.  It enables me to see certain commitments to the ministry through to completion.  I wouldn't dream of walking out of a board meeting to go work on my sermon; I wouldn't interrupt pastoral counseling with a grieving family to start making phone calls or to receive another parishioner who suddenly appears (again, unless it was an even more urgent emergency).  Why should assembling the gift of a good Sunday sermon warrant any less care?

The author of the article indicates that interruptions are an important reality in ministry.  I completely agree.  

But, never guarding certain pockets of time from interruption would not work for me.  It would be chaotic.  It could open the door to not being dependable.  It would be rude and disrespectful to parishioners who need and deserve a moment with a fully engaged pastor.   

posted in: Work: Interrupted

I appreciate both of your observations and reflections on this post. I agree that preaching the Word is very important to faith formation and it is central to worship. I also agree that careful preparation is needed to faithfully preaching God's Word. It is something exciting and also terrifying to do each Sunday (for some, twice a Sunday). It is a great responsibility to correctly and faithfully preach His word. Yet ministry isn't about just that. It is part of it but not the only part of it. Reading through the Gospels, yes, Jesus took time away from people. He didn't take time to prepare his sermon on the mount though. He took time to pray, he took time to connect with The Father, he took time to rest. Reading through the Gospels, Jesus was about people. He was about the sinners, the tax collectors, those on the fringes. He even calls the pharisees to repentance and invites them into the kingdom.

I find that the word "balance" is tossed around as an excuse to hide away rather than engage; to evade rather than encounter. Reading the Gospels, Jesus lived rhythm not balance. He lived in a rhythm of doing God's work and then rest and prayer (for example, he went to pray before and after important events in the book of Mark). He had a rhythm of work and rest. You're welcome to check out my blog where I look more into this subject of work and rhythm here http://spiritualmusclehead.wordpress.com/2014/06/16/coffee-rest-and-work/ here http://spiritualmusclehead.wordpress.com/2013/11/14/sweet-hour-of-prayer/ here http://spiritualmusclehead.wordpress.com/2011/12/14/the-art-of-not-doing/ here http://spiritualmusclehead.wordpress.com/2012/10/30/the-art-of-silence/ and here http://spiritualmusclehead.wordpress.com/2013/07/23/be-still-2/

Rhythm is important to doing ministry. God created the world in 6 days and rested on the 7th, not because he had to because he was tired but because he knew rhythm. Jesus lived this rhythm, not balance. Engaging people helps me engage God's word. If I do not know what someone is going through, how I can faithfully speak God's word to them, allowing the Spirit to move in their hearts?

Thank you again for your comments and observations and thoughts. May God bless you in doing his kingdom work

posted in: Work: Interrupted

It's interesting that scripture tells us Jesus would slip away from the crowds to the mountains to pray.  Not even his disciples were around.  It would seem that during those moments Jesus was not interrupted.  Perhaps the Savior valued balance.  Like Doug Bouws has indicated, I find it important to engage people when they appear, guarding their time with me from interruption.  And its necessary to have stretches of concentrated time to prepare for Sundays.  I find it necessary and rewarding to have this type of balance.

posted in: Work: Interrupted

I've been going to the library for years to get sermon work done.  I make little or no progress at the office.  I set aside time to be interrupted (when i'm at home/at the office), and time when I can focus and think without being interrupted.   If I didn't my sermons would never get finished.  You can accomplish ministry by engaging people when they are appear or you can accomplish ministry by being able to think clearly and write a good sermon.  I think both are important.

posted in: Work: Interrupted

Thanks, Ken.  Good stuff.

- Dave Vroege, Halifax

posted in: Life Together

Hi there,

The links to the talks are not working. I would love to listen to these talks, do you have alternative links?

 

Thanks,

Larry, 

A resource you might be interested in is Key Ministry's blog, Church4EveryChild, written by Dr. Steve Grcevich. He regularly writes about how the church can include families and individuals impacted by mental illness. 

Thanks for shedding light on this import topic!

Katie

Hi Chris,

Thank you for this blog post.  I like your angle.  We too "vacate" a bit during the summer, as we love to go camping and visit family.  But like you suggest, I'm trying to take more "Sabbath" during my vacation.  Slowing things down, reading more, spending more time in quiet.  We also spend considerable time in our backyard, working in the garden, but also spending time in solitude and silence, in God's creation.  But as much as we enjoy staying home during summer holiday time, we've also learned to get a way a bit, as you'll know that when a pastor is home, he is "on-call."

May the Lord bless our Summer-Sabbath breaks!

--Leon

I once had a wise spiritual director say words to me that I will never forget and that have helped guide my life ever since: She said, "Consider the things that bring you life; consider the things that bring you death; and don't do violence to yourself." Work for me includes both those things that bring life, and those that bring death; and I can tell when the balance gets shifted and I need to make some changes. The Lord has created us with a need for Sabbath, for rest, for the renewing and refreshing of our souls. This blog is thought-provoking for me. What brings life to my soul? A vacation-day or a holy-day?

This article touches on something I heard recently. John MacArthur (Masters Seminary) made this statement. "There are two large global movements currently in place. One is the Charismatic and the other is Reformed." I wonder why we seem to be in wane here in N.America and yet globally we see a growing influence of Reformed minded. Any thoughts on this obserevation? 

posted in: Supply Management

Thanks Jeff. Those resources are added to my togettoread list.

Appreciate it. Thanks Kim.

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