Participant

Bev Roozeboom

About Me: 

I've lived in Pella, Iowa all my life.  I've been married to Steve, my high school sweetheart for 30 years.  We have two adult daughters, and one adult son.  Our oldest daughter, Stephanie (27) is married to Kirk and has three precious children - Konner, Haley, and Kaden (twins).  Steve and I love being grandpa and grandma!  Our middle child is Katie (age 24), and our youngest child is our son, Kyle (18). 

I work part-time as a bookkeeper in a business my dad started almost 40 years ago.  My youngest brother and his wife now own it.  I love working with and for family.  My job is very flexible which has been wonderful.  It would have been difficult to hold down a full-time job, especially when Kyle was little. 

Interests: 

I love to read, go for walks (although not so much in the winter), and have deep, meaningful conversations over tea!  My passion is prayer.  I love to pray for and with the people God places on my heart and in my life.  I also love to spend lots of time in the Word.  God has blessed me with a schedule that allows for frequents times of one-on-one with Him. 

I've been a Bible study leader for several years.  I was a Coffee Break leader in our church for about 15 years, until I sensed God asking me to step down from that.  I loved C/B and still miss it!  Currently I'm leading in-depth Bible studies (such as Beth Moore) in our church.  I love that, too!  I guess I just really enjoy studying Scripture with other women.

Q&A
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How have you dealt with resolving sibling resentment?

Let's face it, having a child with a disability affects the whole family. As parents, we legitimately need to give extra time and attention to a child who struggles with physical, intellectual, or emotional challenges. What are some ways you've dealt with resentment from your other children for the amount of attention your special needs child is given? I would love to hear not only from families whose children are still at home, but also from families whose children are grown. Parents of adult children with disabilities still continue to give them a large percentage of their time - especially...
Disability Concerns
  • Thanks for posting this. Very powerful. 

  • Mark, thanks for sharing this on your blog today.  Wow.  Amazing stories, all.  My heart aches for so many.  But amidst the confusion, the pain, and the sadness are glimmers of hope.  Christ's...

  • Anje and Willie and Melissa,

    Somehow I missed the posts about the going-home of your precious little daughters.  I'm sitting here stunned, sad, shocked.  I am so, so sorry for your losses...

    posted on: Hidden Truths
  • thanks for this beautifully honest post.  I could resonate with so much of what you wrote.  My son (w/ disabilities) is now 19.  I find that the milestone years are often when the grief (for lack...

    posted on: My Heart Hurts
  • hi Anje,

    I'm sending you a private email about the Bible study.  Thanks for sharing the letter you posted above.  We don't usually feel like heros, though, do we?  We just do what we need...

  • Hi Anje,

    I'm glad you found this forum!  There's something so comforting about knowing that we're not walking this journey alone.  Even though many miles and much water separates us, we...

  • What a neat story!  God is so faithful, isn't He.  Church attendance has been an off and on problem with our son, as well.  When his anxieties really started to rise (upper elementary/ middle...

  • It's so good to hear the journeys of others. Thanks so much for sharing!  Sarah, thanks for sending the link to John Piper's sermon.  That was amazing!

    BTW, Jill -- welcome to the forum!  I...

  • Actually, I think what most of us parents find ourselves wondering is "why my child?"  We don't ask this in a whiny, self-pitying way, but as part of our grief.  We see our kids struggle to simply...

  • Back again...Most of us in the group said we struggled from time to time wondering if perhaps we had done something wrong (and that's why God gave us a child with a disability).  The thinking is...