Musical Recommendations for "Great I Am" Song?

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Has anyone used the song "Great I Am" (Jared Anderson) in worship? If so, I was looking for any suggestions about how to make the song more easily singable for the congregation. It seems that no matter what key I put it in, either the verse is too low or high or the bridge is too low or high to sing. I was looking at using it in the key of D, but then I get stuck at the bridge where it gets very high...

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In the key of D, the bridge is not too high.  It only goes up to a high D, which is decent for most congregations, if the song doesn't linger there.   The second chorus hits a high G (except for a possible grace note up to A).  While this makes for powerful music, it makes the song less congregation friendly.  Just like "God Of This City," the chorus is repeated an octave higher, which makes for a wide vocal range.  

The lowest note is the tonic, D.  That could be pushed a bit lower, and still congregation-friendly.  

 Try for the key of B (key G capo 4 if you play guitar).  That gives you a B on the low end, and high E.  Still a wide range, but probably better.  (I'm not in front of my piano, nor do I have my guitar in hand.  I may be slightly off).

This is the most vexing question isn't it?  What key is going to work for "regular" singers?   It's true that in the Key of D, the bridge gets too high, and it stays there, fatiguing the voice.  In the Key of B, the lowest note is actually going to be an F-sharp below middle C which is low, but manageable (maybe let your altos carry the verse?).   The bridge is better in this key, but I still think the chorus repeat up the octave is too high for the congregation to maintain.  And in B the first choruses then don't have that "lift" or energy b/c of the lowness.  What about trying it in C, but not doing the octave jump for the final chorus?  Could that work?  Or do we lose the effect and drive after the bridge if we settle into the "regular" chorus range?  Paul Ryan and his team from the LOFT just did this song at a worship conference in Ontario and as someone worshiping in the congregation, I think it worked.  What key was that, Paul?