Annual Review

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As we head into May, we are approaching the end of the church year.  Now is a good time to review the work of the past year.  We usually like to gloss over this moment.  After all, some are coming to the end of their terms of office and are fading out of the job.  Others feel a little guilty about what they failed to do.  Hopes and ambition talked about earlier in the year have been met with the realities of life – usually busy, usually filled with scheduling conflicts, and usually with conflicts with what is important to do right now.  We would rather not rehearse our failures or look too closely at our guilt. 

But it is May and in preparation for setting goals for the next year it is worthwhile to answer a few questions:

  1. What went well in our work this year?  Where did we fail?
  2. Are people growing in faith?
  3. How does our work enhance the spiritual growth of the members of the congregation?
  4. What parts of our life together cause us to celebrate?  What parts of our life together are most disturbing? 
  5. How does our work enhance the communal vision & mission of the church?
  6. We need to budget our time and resources.  What would be the most effective use of our time and resources?  Which people? Which activities?
  7. Which “lost sheep” would you name as needing rescuing?
  8. When you look to the next year, what do you see as “upcoming concerns”? 

You probably would have other questions.  You can share them in the comments. 

But take some time to do a review.  The conversation will help to focus the attention of the elders as the next season begins.  And perhaps through the conversation a greater sense of unity of ministry can develop. 

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Good points, Neil.